Trade networks world history. Classical (600 BCE 2019-01-07

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African trade networks

trade networks world history

In Europe, Christianity provided cultural continuity in the absence of strong centralized rule, while Islam united the Middle East and North Africa. In the long run they were never able to completely monopolize this network but did succeed in building a trading-post empire which gave them a significant share of the spice and slave trade. The cosmopolitan and diverse experiences of slaves offer rich topics for discussion about the meaning of slavery itself. As with Buddhism, missionaries were instrumental in the diffusion of the faith. For example, the United States has had an against for over 40 years.

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Key Concept 3.1

trade networks world history

Like our Lascaux Cave Paintings, these guys were discovered by accident. Instead of viewing African languages as subservient to European in the formation of a creole language, Larson argues that for many Malagasy became the dominant tongue, with other language groups adapting to it, including at times Europeans. However, the Silk Road routes were reopened once during the Middle Ages thanks to one of the most feared armies of all time: the Mongols. Muslim rule expanded to many parts of Afro-Eurasia due to military expansion, and Islam subsequently expanded through the activities of merchants and missionaries. Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical range of existing and newly active trade networks. Crops such as rice, wheat, eggplant and citrus were transplanted across Islamic civilization thus creating year-round cultivation in some areas.

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Key Concept 3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks

trade networks world history

Soon they became common foods that took the place of most indigenous crops, except maize corn. Fast-ripening rice from Champa Vietnam doubled rice production, and trade along the completed Grand Canal connected the northern and southern areas of China. Across the Indian Ocean a vibrant trade existed that used the monsoon winds and enriched East Africa, India, Persia, and elsewhere. The beliefs and practices of Islam reflected interactions among Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians with the local Arabian peoples. The more market-oriented approach reduced inefficiencies and stimulated private investment, particularly by farmers, that led to increased productivity and output. However, Austronesian peoples were only part of a series of waves of peoples who traveled and migrated across the Indian Ocean, often establishing and then developing trade routes. Like an ancient version of the Wild West frontier, towns began sprouting up like never before anywhere that a pit-stop or caravan-to-ship port was necessary.

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How Ancient Trade Changed the World

trade networks world history

As these empires expanded their boundaries, they also faced the need to develop policies and procedures to govern their relationships with ethnically and culturally diverse populations: sometimes to integrate them within an imperial society and sometimes to exclude them. Individuals could now participate in an unseen world of cosmic importance and were taught a way to secure life beyond the grave. Each monsoon season brought with it predictable patterns of winds, which reversed six months later. The northern border, whose weakness had made the Han so vulnerable, was now able to have stronger fortifications. . They then brought this gold back across the Sahara to trade to Arab and Mediterranean merchants. Eventually, Islam became a robust presence throughout the Indian Ocean world's trading networks and port cities.

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8 Trade Routes That Shaped World History

trade networks world history

The Phoenicians were the equivalent of the international haulage trucks of today, and just as ubiquitous. There would be profound cultural, demographic, political and social consequences. Some trade did occur in the west. For more on trade networks also see Francesca Trivellato, The Familiarity of Strangers: The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period. What was novel about Columbus was his conviction that the distance between Europe and Asia to the west was not significant. Nevertheless, merchants carried goods across these routes during the classical age, facilitated by the domestication of the camel.

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Afro

trade networks world history

I always thought that it looked run down because of how old it was. Cowrie shells were exported from the Maldive islands as commodity goods as well as a form of money throughout the Indian Ocean world and beyond, including interior China where archeological digs have unearthed cowrie shells from over 3000 years ago. Larger systems were important in maintaining these legal rights across a large space, such as Islamic legal traditions, which provided for a set way of dealing with slaves, including manumission. A farmer could now trade grain for meat, or milk for a pot, at the local market, which was seldom too far away. The fall of the Roman empire, and the succeeding brought instability to and a near collapse of the trade network in the western world.


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8 Trade Routes That Shaped World History

trade networks world history

This era really deals with the Classical Civilizations Mediterranean, India, China and the trade between them and what goes along with that. Beginning with the Portuguese, Europeans attempted to install a Mediterranean system of trade which used military might to divert trade through trading ports they controlled. In Cambodia, Vietnam, the Malay peninsula and Java, Chinese diaspora communities connected Mongol trade routes to foreign trading ports of the Indian Ocean network. The Protestant Reformation quickly became political as some European monarchs left the Catholic Church only to free themselves from the Pope's authority and become more autonomous. In key places along important trade routes, merchants set up diasporic communities where they introduced their own cultural traditions into the indigenous culture. Trade in luxury goods was also facilitated by innovations in forms of credit and economic exchange.

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Ancient Egyptian civilization (article)

trade networks world history

On the Malay peninsula in southeast Asia, the Buddhist kingdom of Srivijaya thrived on the lucrative spice trade that flowed through the straits of Malacca. Plantation slaves discovered that molasses, a byproduct of the production of sugar that was often discarded, could be distilled into alcohol. This system not only allowed for the cultivation of cotton, but was applied to other crops as well. The cedar is a tall tree with a thick girth, making it ideal for timber. Merchant ships on maritime trade routes and pack animals on caravan routes introduced the Roman Empire to devastating epidemics. Indeed, the Indian Ocean has a long history, spanning at least two thousand years providing the space for various patterns to emerge yet at the same time showing how these patterns influenced exchanges and connections on a more confined level. A relic is an object connected to an important religious person, such as the ashes or belongings of a well known Buddhist monk.


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Key Concept 2.3 Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange

trade networks world history

Combined with a deluge of silver from the Americas, Mughal wealth was enormous; elite sponsorship of artists led to an outburst of creativity with distinctive Mughal forms of art developing. Britain shared its abundance of tin. The Hyksos imposed their own political rulers but also brought many cultural and technological innovations, such as bronze working and pottery techniques, new breeds of animals and new crops, the horse and chariot, the composite bow, battle-axes, and fortification techniques for warfare. The Indian Ocean Basin is becoming an important topic in middle and high school world history and geography courses, but one for which there are few instructional resources. They did not actively promote trade, but private merchants traded manufactured porcelain, silk and cotton. This weakening of Buddhism led to the development of Neo-Confucianism. The Ming relied on mandarins, a class of powerful officials, to implement their policies on the local level.


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