Robert hooke biography. Robert Hooke 2019-01-13

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Robert Hooke Biography, Life, Interesting Facts

robert hooke biography

Robert Hooke was appointed the Royal Society's first Curator of Experiments in 1662, and he rose to be Secretary of the Royal Society. He stated the inverse square law to describe planetary motions in 1678, a law that later used in modified form. The position gave him rooms at the College and required him to give one lecture each week in term time. Somewhat more extensive information on Hooke's life and accomplishments is available in, part of the; and in the online essay. Many of the scientists in Oxford had been appointed because of their Puritan sympathies and they now lost their positions and moved to London. Robert Hooke provided many important contributions to a wide range of scientific fields including physics, chemistry, anatomy, biology, geology, paleontology, architecture, and memory. He did however secure another appointment, namely that of Professor of Geometry at Gresham College, London, being appointed there in 1665.

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Robert Hooke

robert hooke biography

Although formally a curate, since the minister was also Dean of Gloucester Cathedral and of Wells, John Hooke was left in charge of All Saints. He was able toenter Westminster School at the age of thirteen, and from there went to Oxford, wheresome of the best scientists in England were working at the time. This diagram outlines the major discoveries that make up the creation of cell theory and highlights Robert Hooke's contribution. Historians have described Hooke as a difficult and unreasonable man but in many ways this is a harsh judgement. Hooke and Newton discussed their ideas in letters to each other. Hooke was never a person who did one thing at a time, indeed he seemed at his best when his mind was jumping from one idea to another. It was his pioneering work on planetary gravitation, however, that got him into trouble with Newton.

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Robert Hooke Biography

robert hooke biography

In many ways it did not look a marvellous deal for he was required to demonstrate three or four experiments at every meeting of the , something that was quite unrealistic and it is doubtful that anyone other than Hooke could have contemplated being able to provide. He worked with Boyle for seven consecutive years, after which he was appointed as the curator of experiments for the Royal Society of London. Just two years after his death, Hooke's biographer, Richard Waller, described Hooke as 'despicable' and 'crooked'. The English physicist Robert Hooke 1635-1703 was one of the most ingenious and versatile experimenters of all time. It was a well off church being in the patronage of St John's College, Cambridge.

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Robert Hooke Facts for Kids

robert hooke biography

It could have led to him making a fortune, but when he realised that the patent would allow anyone who improved on his design to receive the royalties, he refused to continue with the patent. Hooke has been described as a:-. In just a short time, Robert Boyle, the famous chemist, appointed him as his assistant. There are a few instances when he recorded that he had been drunk. Robert's own ideas involved his observational skills and his mechanical skills. However, some of his readers ridiculed him for spending so much of his time and money on such trifling pursuits. With this newly acquired wealth, Robert travelled to London and started working as an apprentice.

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Robert Hooke Biography

robert hooke biography

His experiments and studies covered a vast range of subjects like physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, geology, architecture and naval technology. Publication date January 1665 Micrographia: or Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses. A member of the Royal Society from 1663, Hooke was accomplished in astronomy, biology, physics and architecture, and his skill as an instrument maker gave him an edge over his contemporaries. On the other hand, we should note that he was on very good terms with some colleagues, particularly and. His name is somewhat obscure and no portrait of him survives today, partly due to his enmity with his more famous and influential colleague, Sir Isaac Newton. Not only did Robert show talents at science, but he also showed skills at drawing. Although the demands meant that he never had time to develop his ideas over time as one would expect a leading scientist to do, on the other hand it seemed to suit his nature to have his mind jump for one half thought out idea to the next.

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Micrographia

robert hooke biography

When Newton published his Principia, he did not credit anything to Hooke. Frequent bitter disputes with fellow scientists occurred throughout Hooke's life. A better air pump than that used by von Guericke had been made by Greatorix but Hooke felt that he could improve on the design. However I am well pleased to find that the truth will at length prevail when men have laid aside their prepossessions and prejudices. Relatively little is known about Robert Hooke's life.

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Robert Hooke Biography (1635

robert hooke biography

With this he travelled to London and acquired an art apprenticeship under Peter Lely and Samuel Cowper. He was born July 18, 1635 in Freshwater, Isle of Wight, England, and died on March 3, 1703 in London, England at age 67. A is available from the website. He built a compound microscope and used it to observe the smallest, previously hidden details of the natural world. He noted that, under the microscope, cork was porous like a honeycomb, and that these regularly-spaced pores resembled the cells of a monastery.

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Micrographia

robert hooke biography

In 1660, the Royal Society—the oldest national scientific society in the world—was formed by 12 men at the Gresham College. Known for its spectacular copperplate engravings of the miniature world, particularly its fold-out plates of , the text itself reinforces the tremendous power of the new. Newton became President of the Royal Society that same year and many of Hooke's collections and instruments went missing as well as the only known portrait of the man. However, Hooke became the first scientist to examine fossils using a microscope. Hooke was the first to replace pendulums in clocks with springs. Hooke's first publication was a pamphlet on capillary action. His studies of microscopic led him to become one of the first proponents of a theory of.

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